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Component® with Tylan® cattle implants — protect and maximize your implant investment
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Compudose®

Elanco's long-acting cattle implants — maximize performance for extended grazing or feeding periods
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Encore®

Elanco's long-acting cattle implants — maximize performance for extended grazing or feeding periods
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Micotil® (Tilmicosin injection)

Micotil — Put the benefits of the flex dose to work in your operation
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Optaflexx® (Ractopamine hydrochloride)

More Profit Potential
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Pulmotil® (Tilmicosin)

14 days of sustained BRD control in the palm of your hands
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Rumensin® (Monensin Feedyard and Pasture)

Rumensin® — Adding more profit to the bottom line
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StandGuard® Pour-On

StandGuard Pour-on—delivers quick-kill action
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Tylan® Premix (Tylosin)

A proven, therapeutic cattle feed ingredient
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Tylan® Injection (Tylosin)

Tylan 200 Injection — a versatile, cost-effective cattle antibiotic

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Rumensin® (Monensin Feedyard and Pasture)

Rumensin® — Adding more profit to the bottom line

Feedyard

Improves feed efficiency and prevents and controls coccidiosis in feedlot cattle

Since 1976, cattle producers have relied on Rumensin to improve feed efficiency and prevent and control coccidiosis. And for 40 years, Rumensin has demonstrated proven results and continuous innovation, adding more profit potential to the bottom line.

Rumensin is a cost-effective feed additive that improves feed efficiency by providing more energy from the ration.1 Research demonstrates that Rumensin improves feed efficiency by 4 percent and provides a net return of $23.13/hd.2

For the prevention and control of coccidiosis, Rumensin is the most potent feed ingredient available3 that kills coccidiosis parasites at three different stages in the life cycle instead of merely slowing their development.4 It's more efficacious at lower doses compared to other ionophores.3


Rumensin Feedyard

Coccidiosis declines in commercial feedyards since Rumensin introduction

Rumensin was first cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for feedlot cattle in 1975 to improve feed efficiency. Throughout 1976, cattle feeders started adopting Rumensin in their commercial feedyards and found the prevalence of coccidiosis started to decline. At that time, coccidiosis was one of the most detrimental diseases, with estimated costs averaging $54.25/infected animal5.

From 1974 to 1982, the annual death loss from coccidiosis in Kansas and Nebraska feedlots dropped from 55–60 deaths/100,000 cattle to fewer than five deaths/100,000 cattle over the eight-year period—a 92 percent reduction5. As seen in the table below, coccidiosis has declined in feedlots since the introduction of Rumensin.


decline cocci graph

Pasture

Improves gain, all while preventing and controlling coccidiosis in grazing cattle

For only pennies per head per day, you can sell heavier stocker and background cattle
Rumensin is a proven management tool that optimizes your investment by improving cattle weight gain, even as quality of forage changes from year to year.6 For pennies per head per day, Rumensin delivers 20 lbs or more per head of additional selling weight during a 100-day grazing period.6

Rumensin pasture image

The only ionophore approved for mature beef cows
Rumensin improves feed efficiency in beef cows, reducing their feed requirements 5 to 10 percent while maintaining body weight with no negative impacts on reproductive performance.7 Rumensin also improves average daily gain in replacement heifers, resulting in fewer days to first estrus—which can result in improved lifetime productivity.8

Rumensin for coccidiosis in cattle
For the prevention and control of coccidiosis, Rumensin is the most potent feed ingredient available that kills coccidia parasites at three different stages of development9,10 instead of merely slowing their development. In addition, it’s a more efficacious coccidiostat at lower doses compared to other ionophores.8

rumensin-and-coccidiosis-lifecycle-grahpic

Important Safety Information

CAUTION: Consumption by unapproved species or feeding undiluted may be toxic or fatal. Do not feed to veal calves.

For the prevention and control of coccidiosis due to Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii:The label contains complete use information, including cautions and warnings. Always read, understand and follow the label and use directions.

Directions for Use

Feedyard

Dosage/Use levels

Rumensin: Cattle fed in confinement for slaughter
For improved feed efficiency: Feed 5 to 40 g/ton of monensin (90% DM basis) continuously in a complete feed to provide 50 to 480 mg/hd/d.

For the prevention and control of coccidiosis due to Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii: Feed 10 to 40 g/ton of monensin (90% DM basis) continuously to provide 0.14 to 0.42 mg/lb of body weight/d of monensin up to a maximum of 480 mg/hd/d.

Pasture

Dosage/Use Levels

Rumensin: Growing cattle on pasture or in dry lot (stockers, feeders, and dairy and beef replacement heifers)

For increased rate of weight gain: Feed 50 to 200 mg/hd/d in at least 1.0 lb of Type C medicated feed. Or, after the 5th day, feed 400 mg/hd/d every other day in at least 2.0 lbs of Type C medicated feed. The Type C medicated feed must contain 15 to 400 g/ton of monensin (90% DM basis). Do not self-feed.

For the prevention and control of coccidiosis due to Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii: Feed at a rate to provide 0.14 to 0.42 mg/lb of body weight/d, depending upon severity of challenge, up to a maximum of 200 mg/hd/d. The Type C medicated feed must contain 15 to 400 g/ton (90% DM basis).

Free-Choice (Self-Fed) Medicated Feeds: Approved supplements must provide not less than 50 nor more than 200 mg/hd/d of monensin.

Rumensin: Mature reproducing beef cows

For improved feed efficiency when receiving supplemental feed: Feed continuously at a rate of 50 to 200 mg/hd/d. Cows on pasture or in dry lot must receive a minimum of 1.0 lb of Type C medicated feed/hd/d. Do not self-feed.

For the prevention and control of coccidiosis due to Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii: Feed at a rate of 0.14 to 0.42 mg/lb of body weight/d, depending upon severity of challenge, up to a maximum of 200 mg/hd/d.

Rumensin: Calves (excluding veal calves)

For the prevention and control of coccidiosis due to Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii: Feed at a rate of 0.14 to 1.0 mg/lb of body weight/d, depending upon severity of challenge, up to a maximum of 200 mg/hd/d. The Type C medicated feed must contain 10 to 200 g/ton of monensin (90% DM basis).

1Richardson, L., Raun, A., Potter, E. et al. 1976. “Effect of monensin on rumen fermentation in vitro and in vivo.” J. Anim. Sci. 43: 657–664.
2Elanco Animal Health. Data on file.
3Long, P. and Jeffers, T. 1982. “Studies on the stage of action of ionophorous antibiotics against eimeria.” J. Parasitology. 68(3): 363–371.
4McDougald, L. 1980. “Chemotherapy of coccidiosis.” The Biology of the Coccidia, P. Long (ed.): 373–427.
5Edwards, A. 1984. “A new look at digestive diseases in feedlot cattle.” Animal Nutrition and Health. Jan-Feb: 28–30
6Elanco Animal Health. Data on file.
7Freedom of Information Summary (NADA95–735).
8Elanco Study Nos. T1F207848, T1F307853, T1F367767, T1F427824 & T1F4876A3. Data on file.
9McDougald, L. 1980. “Chemotherapy of coccidiosis.” The Biology of the Coccidia, P. Long (ed.): 373–427.
10Long, P, and Jeffers, T. 1982. “Studies on the stage of action of ionophorous antibiotics against Eimeria.” J. Parasitology 68(3): 363–371.

Rumensin is a trademark of Elanco or its affiliates.