Rumensin is approved for increased rate of weight gain and for the prevention and control of coccidiosis due to the protozoan parasites Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii in dairy replacement heifers. Rumensin contributes to the growth and health of heifers through two mechanisms:

  • Improving rumen fermentation1
  • Killing coccidia in the small and large intestines1

In the rumen, Rumensin alters the microbial population, resulting in greater production of propionic acid. Production of propionic acid allows the calf to capture more energy from the ration and serves as the major substrate for glucose synthesis in the liver,2 increasing rate of weight gain in growing cattle and improving milk production efficiency** in lactating and dry cows.

Rumensin prevents and controls coccidiosis. Some other products used to control coccidiosis simply interrupt the coccidiosis growth cycle. They prevent further growth as long as the drug is present in adequate levels. When these products are removed from the feed, growth of the coccidiosis parasites resumes and can lead to coccidiosis breaks. Those compounds are referred to as “static” products, in contrast to Rumensin which renders a “cidal” or killing effect.

Right from the start

The best way to get solid control of coccidia is to feed Rumensin right from the start. When calves are first born, their starter feed should contain Rumensin at a level ranging from 30 to 60 g/ton. Research has shown that feed intake is maintained at these concentrations of Rumensin in the starter feed.3 By including Rumensin in the starter feed, the coccidian have the opportunity to be killed in a timely manner following ingestion. Good control from the beginning increases the ability of calves to maintain a desired growth rate and avoid breaks associated with changing environment and diets at transition.

Important safety information

The label contains complete use information, including cautions and warnings. Always read, understand and follow the label and use directions. Consumption by unapproved species or feeding undiluted may be toxic or fatal. Do not feed to veal calves.

Dosage/Use Levels

Dairy cows

For increased milk production efficiency (production of marketable solids-corrected milk per unit of feed intake).

Feeding Directions

Total mixed rations (complete feed): Feed continuously to dry and lactating dairy cows a TMR containing 11 to 22 g/ton monensin on a 100% dry matter basis.  

Component feeding systems (including top dress): Feed continuously to dry and lactating dairy cows a Type C Medicated Feed containing 11 to 400 g/ton monensin (Table 3).  The type C Medicated Feed must be fed in a minimum of 1 pound of feed per cow per day to provide 185 to 660 mg/head/day monensin to lactating cows for 115 to 410 mg/head/day monensin to dry cow.  

The monensin concentration in the Type C medicated Feed must be between 15 and 400 grams per ton. During the first 5 day, cattle should receive no more than 100 mg per day contained in not less than 1 pound of feed. Do not self-feed.

For dairy and beef replacement heifers: Feed at the rate of not less than 50 nor more than 200 mg head per day in not less than one pound of Type C Medicated Feed; or after the 5th day, feed at a rate of 400 mg per head per day every other day in not less than 2 pounds of Type C Medicated Feed. 

For the prevention and control of coccidiosis due to Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii: Feed at a rate to provide 0.14 to 0.42 mg per pound body weight per day, depending upon severity of challenge, up to a maximum of 200 mg per head per day. The monensin concentration in the Type C medicated Feed must be between 15 and 400 grams per ton. During the first 5 days, cattle should receive no more than 100 mg per day contained in not less than 1 pound of feed. Do not self-feed.

Calves (excluding veal calves):

For the prevention and control of coccidiosis due to Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii: Feed at a rate of 0.14 to 1.00 mg per pound of body weight per day, depending upon severity of challenge, up to a maximum of 200 mg of monensin per head per day.  The monensin concentration in Type C Medicated Feed must be between 10 and 200 g/ton 

 

** Production of marketable solids-corrected milk per unit of feed intake.

1. McGuffey R., Richardson, L. and Wilkinson, J. 2001. “Ionophores for Dairy Cattle: Current Status and Future Outlook.” J. Dairy Sci. 84(E. Suppl.): E194–E203.

2. Greenfield, R., Cecava, M. and Donkin, S. 2000. “Changes in mRNA Expression of Gluconeogenic Enzymes in Liver of Dairy Cattle during the Transition of Lactation.” J. Dairy Sci. 83: 1228–1236.

3. Trial No. T1F190302. Elanco Animal Health. Data on File

USDBURUM00157(1)

For Safety Data Sheet (SDS) contact 888-545-5973